How might students exercise greater power as an interest group to exert influence over universities and the role of higher education in US society? What obstacles would students face in organizing and how might they overcome these obstacles?

How might students exercise greater power as an interest group to exert influence over universities and the role of higher education in US society? What obstacles would students face in organizing and how might they overcome these obstacles?

Your paper should go beyond mere description or providing a “book report,” or simply agreeing or disagreeing with particular sources you choose. In other words, your paper should present your original analysis of the topic you have chosen.

Your paper should include an “academic” thesis.

Your paper must cite at least three sources. One source must be course material, another source must be an outside academic source, and the third source can be from anywhere. Of those three sources, at least two must be academic sources (not all sources from this course are academic). You may choose to cite more sources if you deem it necessary or helpful.

This paper should be an attempt to write in the format you will be expected to use post-transfer. This means that your paper should not be speaking to an uninformed audience, but rather speaking to an “academic” or “expert” audience that you will assume already understands the general nature of your topic.

The body paragraphs of your paper should begin with a “topic sentence” that clearly states the major point of each paragraph. Your paragraphs should end with a “transition sentence” that links the point of that paragraph to the next paragraph. The sentences between each topic sentence and each transition sentence in each paragraph should provide evidence and argumentation that supports the paragraph’s topic sentence. In this way it should be possible for a reader to see each point you are making in your paper and how those points connect by only reading the first and last sentence of every body paragraph. Be sure to review your paper to check for this before you submit it.

Your concluding paragraph should simply re-state your introduction. Think of your introduction and conclusion as “book ends” – two things that are basically the same that hold everything between them together. You should not be introducing new evidence, argumentation, or analysis in your conclusion. Unlike writing for a general audience, academic papers do not “build up” to a conclusion. Instead, the point of the entire paper is summarized at the beginning in the thesis statement and then reiterated at the end. If you find yourself writing new material in your conclusion then you have simply discovered a new important point and you should revise your introduction to include your new insight and then create a new concluding paragraph that re-states your revised introduction.

Be careful to revise your introductory paragraph as you write. Most of your learning will take place as you focus on finishing your paper and engaging with your sources. It is very common for the major points of a paper to change as they are being written and for writers to forget to revise the introduction they started with to reflect their new, improved body paragraphs.

Formatting requirements:

12 point Times New Roman font
Name, date, and title only. These should be single-spaced. Do not waste space including other information like the professor’s name or the course title.
The remainder of the paper should be double-spaced.
One-inch margins. Be sure to check that your word processor is not using a different default margin setting.
Four to five pages, not including the citation page.
Avoid overly quoting your sources to take up space. Summarize your sources and use parenthetical citations to avoid plagiarism as much as possible. Overly quoting eats up space, is noticeable, and won’t fly in upper-division courses.
Your parenthetical citations should include the author’s name and the page number. If citing an online source without page numbers, the author’s name is sufficient. Example (Moreno, 12) for a source with page numbers or (Moreno).
Your citation page should provide for each source the name of the author, the date published (if known), the title of the work, the publisher of the work, and if an online source the address to the website.

I will provide the course reading