Concisely define evidenced based practice, the evolution of EBP and how barriers to EBP can be overcome. Briefly give an example of a compelling clinical question that piques your interest.

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Concisely define evidenced based practice, the evolution of EBP and how barriers to EBP can be overcome. Briefly give an example of a compelling clinical question that piques your interest.

Nursing, by itself, is a science, referred to as nursing science, and practice into itself. So, research is an integral part of this profession, practice, and nursing science. According to the National Council of State Boards of Nursing (NCSBN), evidence based practice (EBP) refers to the intersection of the best research, clinical expertise and patient values (NCSBN, n.d.). It means the latest research for an issue or problem is analyzed with expert agreement and keeping values for the patient in mind. Evidence based nursing refers to utilizing the latest research to standardize care and avoid unhealthy outcomes (Correa-de-Araujo, 2016). The nursing field started implementing EBP following the recommendations of the Institute of Medicines five core competencies in 2001 and 2003: patient-centered care, interdisciplinary teams, evidence-based practice, quality improvement, and information technology (Correa-de-Araujo, 2016).
A compelling clinical question that piques my interest is how have nurse practitioners fared in utilizing EBP in the field? It is one thing to read and talk about it in class. What do they do in the clinical practice setting? A recent study showed that nurses in the primary care setting are generally favorable to evidence based practice (Mohsen et al., 2016). However, there are perceptions and barriers to the adoption of EBP. It looked at a group of nurse educators and nursing specialists. Although nurses were receptive to EBP, they were being held back from adopting it. New knowledge is generated but its not being adopted. The reasons found often varied between the educators and specialists. For example, nursing specialists and educators (82.5% & 47/5%) both had difficulty judging the quality of research articles and reports (Mohsen et al., 2016). Almost 2/3 of educators and specialists (73.8% & 85.8%) did not have time to research and read articles (Mohsen et al., 2016). One of the major findings was that most nurse educators and a majority of nursing specialists can identify clinical issues or problems. But, only the majority of nurse educators were able to translate the problem into a well-formulated clinical question and able to tell between different types of questions. Nurse specialists were also found to have a problem with being able to identify clinical problems where they can implement EBP. The nurses, themselves, felt that they were slightly above average ability to identify clinical problems (Mohsen et al., 2016).
The study concluded that the areas needed addressing were inability to distinguish quality of research articles, not enough time to read and research articles at work, and not enough resources at work to implement EBP (Mohsen et al., 2016). To utilize EBP in nursing, we should make sure nurses know the basics when they are getting their bachelors and surely by the time that they reach the end of their graduate education.

References
Correa-de-Araujo, R. (2016). Evidence-based practice in the United States: Challenges, progress, and future directions. Health care for women international, 37(1), 2-22.

Mohsen, M. M., Safaan, N. A., & Okby, O. M. (2016). Nurses perceptions and barriers for adoption of evidence based practice in primary care: Bridging the gap. American Journal of Nursing Research, 4(2), 25-33.

National Council of State Boards of Nursing. (n.d.). Evidence-based Regulation of Nursing Education. https://www.ncsbn.org/668.htm